Month: March 2019

The Pace of Progress

The Pace of Progress

By: Ellianna Leilani Legakis   The scene is a weight room in late winter. The room is not overly populated, but far from empty.  So-called “Provo All-Stars” are using free weights near the entrance. Girls with athletic builds are using the treadmills and weight machines. […]

Age-Appropriate Service: What Can You Do with Your Children?

Age-Appropriate Service: What Can You Do with Your Children?

By: Laura Bushman Service is something that my parents taught me to do from a young age and is still something that I try to do today. The service I do may be small, like doing my roommates’ dishes, or larger, like volunteering in a […]

A Little Bit of Love

A Little Bit of Love

By: Daniela Cota

Dating can be great. I’m sure marriage can be even better. Don’t get me wrong though; if you’re single, take a moment and appreciate it. Recently, a few wonderful women in the church such as Sister Oaks have come out to share that being single is not the end of the world. I know: it’s shocking. Sister Carole M. Stephens recently shared a statistic that 51 percent of women in the church, 18 years and older, are single. This surprised me.

 

Although I’m sure occasional loneliness and heartache are some feelings that are shared among each of these women, they are not defined by this. Whether we are married, single, or in a serious relationship, we, as individuals, are much more than our current relationship status. Although this is a fact that should be well-known, I’m no stranger to feelings of doubt. We may need to remind ourselves on occasion that we have so much to offer the world. Although it can and should be true that our loved ones ultimately make us better people, it doesn’t mean we need to be dependent on this. We have much to offer not because of a link to someone else through love, but because we can learn to be pretty great people all on our own.

 

Figuring out where we are in life can be pretty challenging, and pretty daunting if you are just slowly going through the motions, but sometimes that’s enough. We may not always be happy with our daily actions, or every situation we are in, but we do have the choice to try to make the best of it all.

 

To some, Valentine’s Day may not seem to just encompass one day, but the entire month of February. It can be difficult to see it otherwise as a student on a very relationship-heavy and family-oriented campus. It can be difficult with the Valentine’s decorations plastered all over that remind you that you may not have a significant other. Perhaps though, we can change negative feelings that may come up during this “month of love.” We can allow it to help us be aware of love in other aspects.  Consider the love you have for your family, your roommates, or your friends, and maybe just consider yourself. Take this week to appreciate and love all that you hold dear.

 

Learning to love yourself can be just as enjoyable and fulfilling as a relationship or dating can be. It is something that takes time and patience, just as any other relationship will in our lives. So, wherever you are in life right now, take the time to discover just all that there is to love about yourself. Take the time to appreciate it, and work on whatever it may be that you would like to change. As the saying goes, we can’t truly love anyone else if we don’t first learn to love ourselves.

Baby Name Horrors

Baby Name Horrors

By: Elizabeth Hansen Choosing a baby name can either be an easy baby checklist item or a daunting task! What really matters in this process is that mom and dad are both in love with the name and happy with their decision. However, that doesn’t […]

BYU Passover Seder

BYU Passover Seder

By: Kaytee Johnson Did you know that BYU has held a Passover Seder service every year for over 40 years? And that it’s one of the biggest in the western United States?   Dr. Jeffrey Chadwick (a professor of Religious Education at BYU and the […]

On The Same Page

On The Same Page

by: Mikaela Wilkins

Growing up, my dad would sometimes say, “Do what I say, not what I do,” but as I’ve gotten older, I would say that statement only holds true some of the time. I got a mixed bag of information and examples from my parents when it came to money. For example, they were really good at having a budget, keeping track of spending, and putting money away for savings. On the other hand, they made some risky decisions that put them in debt that they’re still not sure they will ever repay. To help their kids make better choices, they’ve spent a lot of time and energy teaching us (both through example and other people) about how to manage our money—because no matter where you come from, the chances of becoming a millionaire are a lot better if you know how to handle your money.

 The following are a handful of books and resources they provided me. 

The Richest Man in Babylon

The Richest Man in Babylonis a series of parables set in ancient Babylon. It’s a short, easy read, and each parable teaches principles that are applicable to life today. Its principles range from “Seven Cures of a Lean Purse” to the “Five Laws of Gold” that attract greater wealth to you. Besides financial principles, it also encourages changes in character, such as deciding to be your own master, managing risk, and learning the value of work. The Richest Man in Babylon, while not as hands-on as other finance books, inspires individuals to take control of their finances, put their money to work, and obtain personal and financial security.

Uncommon Cents: Benjamin Franklin’s Secrets for Achieving Personal Financial Success

Uncommon Centsfocuses on financial principles and teachings that Benjamin Franklin lived by. Each chapter uses diagrams and examples to help you understand how to apply these principles in your life and includes personal finance worksheets. The authors point out that the way we view money is how we treat it, so besides inviting readers to evaluate their views, they also lay out money myths and counter them with financial principles. Plus, this book is laden with funny comics, pictures, and stories, which always make everything better! 

The Total Money Makeover

Dave Ramsey, author of The Total Money Makeover, has a mantra: “If you live like no one else, then later you can live like no one else.” If you’re looking for a book to get you fired up about financial freedom, then this is the one for you. Dave walks you through how to get out of debt and what to do once you’re free. He encourages you to do whatever you have to do to become financially stable, even if that means “living on rice and beans” for a while. His point: if you make sacrifices now, later you can be ahead of everyone else. You could even be a millionaire! 

The Total Money Makeover is just a springboard to the Dave Ramsey universe. Not only does he have books on succeeding financially but he also offers a class, Financial Peace University, that is moderated by volunteers across the country. When you enroll in membership to his class, you are encouraged to bring your spouse (for free), can indefinitely retake the course (for free), and get access to online videos, PDFs, a book that goes into greater detail of what’s taught in the class, and a free yearlong subscription to the EveryDollar budgeting app. Although it costs about $100 upfront, it could very well be worth it. Not only does it cover getting out of debt but it also goes over saving for your kids’ college, investments, different kinds of insurances, and preparing for retirement. In a way, my parents secured their own financial future by gifting this course to me and my siblings. (My mom gave us the condition that we actually had to go to the class and repay her for every class we missed.)Everyone’s situation is different, so while these books give suggestions and strategies for reaching financial freedom, reading them all can give you liberty to experiment and find what works for you. Some common threads? Live on less than you earn, avoid debt where possible, and give to others when you are able (and don’t when you can’t!). Wherever you’re at in life, whether figuring out finances as a new couple, revamping an old plan as a long-time married couple, or preparing your kids to be financially successful, using books and resources can get you on the same page to finally get ahead. 

Making Dinner Great Again: The Ingredients for a Politically Palatable Dinner Conversation

Making Dinner Great Again: The Ingredients for a Politically Palatable Dinner Conversation

by: Jamie Bjazevich Without any explanation needed, almost everyone knows the taboos of family dinner conversations.Eating together can be a bonding and unifying experience so naturally we avoid topics that could be sources of dispute—politics included. While we might still have a bad taste in […]