Stance: Studies on the Family

Brigham Young University Student Journal

Category: Food & Culture (page 1 of 5)

Gilmore Girls Family Lessons

Do you perk up when you hear the words, Gilmore Girls? Are you still hoping that Netflix will put out a season two of A Year in the Life to answer all those loose ends we were left with? I know that I am.

Gilmore Girls is loved by so many people. It has its hilarious, as well as touching, moments that so many people can relate to in their own lives with their own families. The Gilmore Girls may not live within a traditional home of a married father and mother, yet they are still as much a family as any other family. Rory and Lorelai are truly the ultimate dynamic duo between mother and daughter. They have their rough moments, but they always come back together in love and unity, while making countless, unforgettable friends along the way.

Since we could truly write a book about the different family dynamics in the Gilmore Girls series, the following are just three of the amazing family lessons we can learn from the Gilmore Girls:

  1. Eat Together: One might wonder how the Gilmore Girls can consume so much sugar and take-out while remaining in great health and how they can afford the take-out in the first place, but they can! So many wonderful memories are made for Rory and Lorelai over take-out from Luke’s Diner, Pete’s, and more. It gives them time to bond and have meaningful conversations with each other. Take time to have a special meal or take-out with your family to just enjoy some good junk food and conversation.
  2. Always Apologize: Let’s admit, Rory and Lorelai, especially, do not have the best communication skills. Lorelai and Luke should have been truthful all the time and spoken their true feelings to each other! Lorelai and Emily should have taken the time to communicate their feelings in a civil manner when Lorelai was a teenager. Rory and Lorelai could have even used better communication in their many disagreements over boys, college, and more. No family is free of arguments or explosive communication, however, the Gilmore Girls always make up in the end. We can take this lesson and apply it in our lives—the importance of saying sorry, asking for forgiveness, and never loosing the close bond between family members over a dumb argument or harsh words said in a moment of frustration.
  3. Home is Home: One final lesson to learn from the Gilmore Girls, is that you can always come home. Despite all the craziness that happened in the family dynamic of the Gilmore’s, there was always a home to go to. Despite Lorelai’s struggles through her teenage years, she and her family are always welcome to Emily and Richard’s house. The love was always there; it never left. When Rory struggles through her issues in high school, college, and even post-college life, Lorelai is always there to welcome her home. Sometimes discipline is necessary or advice must be given on a questionable decision, but this does not mean the love is gone, but rather that the love is strong. Let’s remember the family we love in our lives and always have a home for them to come home to in hard times.

BY ELIZABETH HANSEN

Killer Recipes: Mississippi Pot Roast

I’ve never been to Mississippi, but I am oh so grateful for all of the amazing people that live there now, thanks to this pot roast. IT CHANGES LIVES.

I was on Pinterest, looking for fast, easy meals and this blessing popped up on my screen. As with all my Pinterest meals, I was a bit hesitant, but after the first bite I was sold. It’s honestly that easy and good—so good that my husband volunteers to make it for dinner at least once a month.

Some people serve it over mashed potatoes, others take leftovers to make a sub sandwich with a slice of mozzarella cheese and a diced up pepperoncini pepper. In the end, you do you, and enjoy! (But in my house, the only way we have leftovers of this particular meal is if we buy a 5 lb chuck roast . . . for the two of us. Anything less is eaten in one sitting. Oops.)

If you’re worried about the peppers burning your mouth off, there’s no need to stress. The peppers are more of a background flavor that make everything that much better. However, if you’re like me and love a meal that has a kick to it, you can also pour some of the pepper juice into the mixture to cook and then slice up the peppers into the meal when serving.

Ingredients:

(1) 3-5 lb. chuck roast
2 tbsp. olive oil (or vegetable oil)
salt & pepper, to taste
1 packet ranch dressing mix
1 packet dry onion soup mix
1 stick butter (1/2 cup) – REAL salted butter, not margarine
8 pepperoncini peppers

Directions:

*If you’re in a hurry you can skip steps 1–5 and just season the meat before putting it into the crockpot*

  1. Heat up oil in a large skillet on high. You want it really hot to brown the beef quickly.
  2. Dry both sides of the pot roast with a paper towel.
  3. Season with a little bit of salt and pepper and add the roast to the hot oil.
  4. Allow the roast to cook for 2–3 minutes.
  5. Flip the meat over and sear the other side of the roast for another 2–3 minutes.
  6. Transfer meat to slow cooker.
  7. Sprinkle packets of dry ranch dressing & onion soup mixes over pot roast
  8. Top with a stick of butter then place peppers on and around roast.
  9. Cover and cook on low for 8 hours (or high for 4.5–5 hours)
  10. Slice or shred meat before serving. Be sure to throw away any fatty pieces.
  11. ENJOY. ENJOY.

Cook’s Notes: If you are sensitive to sodium, you could use unsalted butter for this. Be sure to use butter and not margarine. Margarine is basically oil. We did not find this recipe salty at all if you use this exact recipe, but be sure to adjust to your preferences.

Credit to “The Country Cook” at https://www.thecountrycook.net/crock-pot-mississippi-pot-roast/

BY CARLY CALLISTER 

Killer Recipes: The Best Bread EVER

Let me tell you a little story.

I am a little bit of a cheapskate . . . or maybe a lotta bit.

Sometimes, as a result, my husband and I eat some foods of questionable quality, because why would I spend 20 more cents per ounce on the name brand?

But sometimes, it results in some really great things.

Ever since getting married, my husband and I have been buying the cheapest bread we could find at the local supermarket. It was 89 cents a loaf, so we thought it was worth the slight stale-ness, and overall cheap-o flavor. I soon started to get sick of it; never wanting to pack a sandwich for lunch because the bread was THAT bad. Food, in my opinion, is all about the pleasure factor, and this bread scored about a -12 on a scale of 1 to 10.

But I wasn’t about to buy the most delicious bread in the bread aisle! No way, José!

So I thought to myself, “How can I have a more pleasurable experience eating cheap bread?”

And then it came to me.

I would just make my own bread. Who doesn’t love homemade bread?

I’d never made homemade bread before—at least, not without the help of a pre-packaged mix—but I figured that buying a mix would defeat the purpose of saving money, so I started my search for a delicious bread recipe.

Since this was my first attempt at the bread making business I decided to go the fool-proof route and save the internet searches for delicious and fluffy bread recipes for another time. That was my first mistake.

I came across this recipe for no-fail Amish bread, and the picture looked yummy, so I trusted it. Ha.

Anyway, I did know at least one thing about baking bread, and that was that it’s different in high elevations, like Utah. I wasn’t sure where this recipe came from, so I looked up what adjustments you could make to bread recipes for high elevation, and I did all of those things, just to be sure. That was my second mistake.

The bread came out of the oven a little stumpy looking, but it looked like bread, so success! Right?

Wrong. It was dense, crumbly, and all around not so delicious. I figured that’s just how bread was going to be, so I kept making that horrid bread recipe! Why, oh why did I do that?

Weeks later, as I began my bread-making, I thought, “Why am I even making this? It’s not even that great.” I slumped down and berated myself as a baker, telling myself I was a failure because my homemade bread didn’t taste nearly as delicious as literally everyone else’s.

But YOU, TOO CAN BAKE. I promise you, if it’s not working, just try a new recipe. You’ll see.

I finally searched for a fluffy bread recipe, because the denseness of my bread was the feature I most disliked about it, and I found the winner, folks.

This recipe is from Connie Armstrong, and was featured on deliacreates.com. It is already adjusted for high altitudes, so don’t worry about it not working (unless you live in a lower altitude than Utah. I haven’t tried it anywhere else, so I don’t know).

Here it is, friends: The tried and true Best Bread EVER

Makes 2 large loaves, 3 medium loaves, or 1 large loaf and 2 mini loaves

Ingredients:

2 1/2 cups HOT water

1/3 cup oil

1/3 cup sugar or honey

1 T salt

3/4 cup flour and about 5-7 cups of flour (divided) *I give flour notes and tips at the end.

1 1/2 TBSP yeast (any kind)

Spray oil

Directions
  1. Whisk water, oil, sugar/honey, and salt together in a large bowl.
  2. Add 3/4 cup flour and whisk for 30 seconds, then yeast and whisk for 30 seconds more.
  3. Add 2-3 cups of flour and mix together with a spoon. If using a mixer, add the rest of the flour.  (The total flour should amount to about 5-7 cups, not including the flour used in step 2.) Let the mixer knead the dough for about 5 minutes plus. If mixing by hand, add the rest of the flour and mix until shaggy looking and hard to work with a spoon. Knead in the bowl a few times and then turn the dough out onto a floured counter. Knead for 5+ minutes. The dough should be soft, but not really sticky.
  4. Let rise in a clean, greased, covered bowl for about* 30 minutes. You can let it rise on the counter, but it will rise nicely in the oven. Set your oven for 450 degrees for a minute or less, then turn it off before placing the oven-safe bowl inside.
  5. When the dough has risen, remove from the oven and heat the oven to 175 degrees.
  6. Grease your bread pans and the counter with spray oil. Divide the dough.
  7. Roll out the dough into a long oblong shape until all the air bubbles are gone.
  8. Roll the dough into a tight cylinder, tuck the ends under or squish them, and place it in a greased bread pan. Repeat with remaining dough.
  9. Place loaves in a warm oven (175 degrees) for about* 1/2 hour, or until the dough has risen to fill the pan.
  10. Turn the oven up to 350 degrees, and cook for about* 30 minutes. The bread is done when you hit the top and it sounds hollow. Don’t worry about time as much as this indicator. The bread isn’t done until you hear the hollow sound. If you are worried that the crust is getting too brown, cover it lightly with a piece of foil.
  11. Turn out on a wire rack and let cool completely before cutting. Smother the top of the loaves with butter if you desire.

* The times listed for rising and baking are approximate. Weather, altitude, your oven, the moisture content of your flour, etc. can all affect how quickly your dough will rise and bake. Make sure that you check to see that the dough has doubled for the first rise, filled the pan for the second rise, and that you hear the hollow sound to know when it is done baking. All these indicators supersede any time estimates given.

BY CARI AVERETT

Easy Plant-Based Meals That Won’t Break the Bank

quinoa-1822176

Meal planning, right? We’ve all been there. Finding healthy, easy, and relatively inexpensive meal ideas isn’t for the faint of heart. As a vegan and gluten and soy free college student, I’ve come to find this out first hand!

Here are a couple of general principles I follow to keep my meals as cheap as possible:

 

  • Shop out of bulk bins as much as possible. Often items cost much, much less this way. Buying out of bulk bins is especially convenient when buying some ingredients for a new recipe that you don’t have on hand already. You can get just the amount you need, and then next time (if the recipe turns out, that is) you can stock up if you choose.That keeps the trial and error process of finding go-to meals as cost effective as possible. Some of the best bulk bins I’ve found are at Winco and Sprouts.

 

  • Use dried spices instead of fresh ones. Whether a spice is dried or fresh when it goes into a recipe often doesn’t significantly, if at all, alter the taste of the recipe. Buying dried spices can be cheaper and much more convenient. I don’t know about you, but when I have bought fresh spices here and there, I use a tiny little bit and then the rest goes to waste. Also, the jars of dried spices often have equivalency information so you can be sure you’re putting the right amount into your recipe.

Luckily, I have found a few good recipes that vegans and non-vegans alike have enjoyed, so hopefully some of these will ease the struggle for you just a bit. Besides being delicious, each of these recipes and meal ideas is also healthy AND easy AND relatively inexpensive. Three for three. The following are five recipes that I hope will be beneficial to you and your family:

 

Lentil Brown Rice Salad

This is a family favorite that makes a nice, light spring or summer meal when paired with a fresh green salad, cooked veggies, grilled or baked chicken if you aren’t vegetarian, or even grilled tofu if you are vegetarian. I’ve even eaten this as a stand-alone lunch before.

1 ½  cups cooked brown rice (cooked in veggie broth)

1 cup cooked lentils*, cooled

1 cup diced fresh tomatoes

⅓ cup sliced green onions, including tops

1 Tbsp snipped fresh parsley

2 Tbsp red wine vinegar

1 Tbsp olive oil

1 ½ tsp fresh lime juice

1 clove garlic, minced

1 tsp Dijon mustard

¼ tsp ground black pepper

Combine rice, lentils, tomatoes, onions, and parsley in medium bowl. Whisk remaining ingredients in small bowl; add to rice mixture and toss. Chill. Makes 4 servings.

*To cook lentils, combine ½ cup dry lentils with 1 cup water in saucepan. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, cover, and simmer 15 to 20 minutes or until lentils are tender. Drain.

 

Quinoa and Black Bean Salad

Another family favorite! Quinoa is packed with nutrition and is a complete protein by itself, so this salad can be a well-rounded meal by itself since it contains unrefined carbs, protein, vegetables, and a little healthy fat. Again, this can be paired with salad, other veggies, lean meat or tofu, or eaten by itself.

1 cup raw quinoa

1 ¾ cups water or veggie broth

2 Tbsp olive oil, divided

1 tsp grated lime zest

1 Tbsp fresh lime juice

1 (15 oz.) can black beans, drained and rinsed

¼-½ cup diced red bell pepper

¼-½ cup diced cucumber

1 roma tomato, chopped

¼ cup fresh cilantro

2 green onions

⅓ tsp salt

½ tsp black pepper

In a saucepan, combine quinoa, water or broth, and 1 Tbsp of oil. Bring to a boil and simmer on low heat for 20 minutes. Fluff quinoa with a fork and let cool to room temperature.

In a small bowl, whisk together lime zest, lime juice, and 1 Tbsp oil.

Transfer the quinoa to a bowl. Add beans, bell pepper, cucumber, tomato, and chopped cilantro. Drizzle with the lime mixture and toss gently to coat.

Serve warm or chilled. Makes 4 servings and 6 cups total.

 

Baked Potatoes

A baked potato bar is a great way for families to eat together while letting family members personalize their own meals. Some of my favorite toppings as a vegan are salsa, green onions, and guacamole. For non-vegans, sour cream, cheese, and butter are some additional options. Chili or leftover chunky soup or stew are other tasty toppings. A simple green salad really compliments these well, and feel free to add meat or tofu to round out the meal, if desired.

I usually follow this aluminum foil oven baking method from “The Kitchn” website.

 

Tomato Basil Cream Pasta

Some people live on Ramen noodles their freshman year of college (and for the duration in a lot of cases– let’s be real); however, I lived on this stuff. It’s quick and easy, and you can substitute ½ to ¾ a can of plain diced tomatoes for the fresh tomato called for in the recipe for convenience. Bulk bins are a great place to look for affordable prices on cashews.You could use whole wheat or brown rice pasta to make this very healthy, or you could even swap out pasta for quinoa. Add a cooked or raw veggie on the side and you’ve got a complete, hearty, nutritionally balanced meal!

Here is the recipe.

 

Easy Vegetable Curry

This goes together so quickly and so easily! It has a very mild flavor, as far as curries go, so don’t be scared if you’re weary of strong flavors. This goes great over rice, quinoa, or even pasta. Because it’s a vegetable curry, no additional vegetables are required to make this a complete meal–bonus! As always, a side of lean meat would be a healthy addition for non-vegetarians.

Here is the recipe.

 

Happy cooking!

By Samantha Bullock

 

Family, Food and Fun: Thanksgiving Recipes

Thanksgiving is coming up and FOOD is the word. When thinking about Thanksgiving, many of us number turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, and pie among the many things that we are grateful for. Many of the memories that I personally have surrounding this time of year involve cooking and eating together with my family (especially my grandma’s amazing coconut cream pie).

Screen Shot 2016-11-10 at 9.13.30 AM

Isn’t it interesting how the food we eat is such a central part of our culture and identity? Traditions surrounding food can vary widely from family to family, and even wider from culture to culture. Something that does not change between cultures, however, is the fact that food brings people together. Research shows that eating together as a family can make a huge difference in having a healthy family life.

Consider using this holiday season as an excuse to take some time to eat a good meal with your family. Cook together, or even just go out to a restaurant together if cooking isn’t your style. No matter where the food comes from, eating a meal and spending time together will create memories, and bring your family emotionally closer.  Now get together and eat up!  

P.S. I thought I’d share with you two of my favorite recipes that my mom would always make during the holidays! They’re easy, inexpensive, and delicious! Bon appétit!

Frozen Cranberry Whip

1) Mix in a large bowl: 1 package whole cranberries (ground in a food processor or blender), 2 cups of sugar, and 1 small package mini marshmallows (10 oz package)

2) Cover bowl and let it sit all day or overnight Screen Shot 2016-11-10 at 9.13.24 AM

3) Later: Whip 1 pint of whipping cream until stiff. Add 3 oz cream cheese (chopped into little chunks), and 1 large can crushed pineapple (drained)

4) Mix everything together (including sugar and cranberry mixture)

5) Separate into two bread-loaf pans, cover and freeze

6) To serve: Briefly run warm around the outside of the pan to loosen frozen loaf and slice up servings

Candied Sweet Potatoes

1) Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 9×13 baking dish

2) Boil a large pot of water, add sweet potatoes, boil until slightly underdone, about 15 minutes.

3) In a large saucepan combine 1 1/4 cups margarine, 1 1/4 cups brown sugar, 2 cups marshmallows, cinamon and nutmeg to taste.

4) Stir potatoes into the margarine sauce. While stirring mash the potatoes.

5) Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes, remove and top sweet potatoes wtih 1 cup of mashmallows, cook until marshmallows are slightly golden.

Written By Rian Gordon

Gratitude for my Grandmother

Gratitude For My Grandmother

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, it’s a great time to reflect on everything we have to be grateful for. This season, my thoughts have especially turned to my grandmother. She is an amazing woman who has taught me a lot about showing love, persevering through trials, and having a good work ethic.

Not only has she taught me a lot about life, but she’s also taught me extensively about cooking. This easy homemade roll recipe of hers is as reliable as her example. When you try it, I’m positive you too will be sending grateful thoughts to my grandmother.rolls picture

Never-Fail Rolls

3/4 cup milk, scalded                     1/2 cup warm water
1/2 cup sugar                                 3 eggs, well-beaten
1/2 cup butter                                  4 1/2 cup flour
2 T yeast                                         1 tsp salt

  1. Pour hot milk over butter and sugar and cool to lukewarm.
  2. Soften yeast in 1/2 cup warm water. Add to milk. Add eggs.
  3. Beat in dry ingredients. Beat well. Refrigerate at least 3 hours or overnight (or let it rise until double).
  4. Roll out and let rise until double.  Bake at 375–400 degrees Fahrenheit for 10–15 min.  It makes about 3 dozen.

My grandma rolls the dough into two circles about 12″ in diameter and cuts each into 16 wedges. If you choose to as well, roll the pieces from the wide edge to the point to make crescents. Place on baking sheet with point down and brush with butter on top.

—Lynn Crandall, Editor, Stance

The Perfect Autumn Breakfast

Autumn is finally here! One telltale sign is the pumpkins that are everywhere—outside buildings and inside food. Pumpkins are great for dinner, snacks, and even for breakfast—the best meal of the day in my opinion. Bring a little bit of autumn into your mornings with these delicious pumpkin pancakes.Perfect Autumn Breakfast

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups milk

1 cup pumpkin puree

1 egg

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 tablespoons vinegar

2 cups all-purpose flour

3 tablespoons brown sugar

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon ground allspice

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1/2 teaspoon salt

 

Instructions:

  • Mix the milk, pumpkin puree, egg, oil, and vinegar. Combine the flour, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda, allspice, cinnamon, ginger, and salt in a separate bowl. Stir the dry ingredients into the pumpkin mixture until just combined.
  • Heat a lightly greased griddle or frying pan over medium heat. Pour about ¼ cup of batter for each pancake.
  • Brown on both sides and serve with syrup if desired.

 This recipe was originally found at allrecipes.com.

 

—Lynne Crandall, Senior Designer, Stance

Happy Oktoberfest!

5683100189_897bef1d33What’s the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of Oktoberfest? If you thought of a man sporting lederhosen while drinking a mug of beer, I’m right there with you.

However, Oktoberfest is more than that and can be celebrated in a family-friendly way.

What started as a royal wedding jubilee in 1810 has now turned into an international festival of German food and culture.

 

Try this German potato salad recipe for your family’s Oktoberfest celebration!

Ingredients:
3 cups diced peeled potatoes
4 slices bacon
1 small onion, diced
1/4 cup white vinegar
2 tablespoons water
3 tablespoons white sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

Directions:
Boil the potatoes. Then drain and set aside to cool.

Fry the bacon until browned and crisp. Remove from pan and set aside.

Add the onion to the bacon grease and cook over medium heat until caramelized.
Add the rest of the ingredients except the parsley. Bring to a boil and then add the
potatoes and parsley.

Sprinkle in half of the bacon. Heat the salad through and then transfer to a serving
dish. Sprinkle the rest of the bacon on top and serve warm.

This recipe was originally found at www.allrecipes.com.

—Lynne Crandall, Senior Designer, Stance

Crock Pot Pulled Pork

SUMMER

SUMMER!!!

Summer is just around the corner, and that means melty popsicles, sunny pool days, family fun, and good barbecue. Here’s a deliciously easy recipe for classic pulled pork.

You’ll need:
5-6 boneless pork chops
12 oz of your favorite cola drink (Dr Pepper, Coke, and Root Beer all work great)
A bottle of your favorite barbecue sauce
Hamburger buns
A crock pot
What to do:
Place the pork chops in the bottom of your crockpot. Fill the crockpot with just enough of your soda to cover the chops. Cook on low for 6-8 hours. The meat will be scrumptiously tender when it’s finished. Drain out most of the liquid, leaving just enough to keep the meat moist. Then, pour in as much barbecue sauce as you’d like and shred the meat using two forks. Scoop a generous amount of meat on a hamburger bun, top with more barbecue sauce if desired, and serve with a summertime favorite like potato salad or watermelon. Enjoy!
—Courtney Johansson, Stance

 

Mrs. Ward’s Waffles and Buttermilk Syrup

The older I get the more convinced I become that breakfast foods make the best dinner. Therefore, WAFFLES. And delicious syrup. My parents always made these waffles from scratch. Apparently my mom got the recipe from a newspaper before any of us can remember. Several years ago my family was introduced to the phenomenon that is buttermilk syrup, and let’s just say we haven’t looked back.

So on days when you need breakfast for dinner—or breakfast for breakfast, or even lunch—try these guys out and tell us what you think!

Waffle

Doesn’t it look delicious?

Buttermilk Syrup

½ cup butter

1 c. sugar

½ cup buttermilk

½ tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. or more maple flavoring

Mix over medium heat. When it foams up, remove from heat and add maple flavor.

 

Mrs. Ward’s Waffles

4 eggs, separated

1 Tbsp. Sugar

1 ½ cups flour, stirred and measured

¾ tsp. salt

4 tsp. baking powder

1 ½ cups milk

1/2 cup shortening, melted and cooled

Beat egg yolks. Combine sugar, flour, salt, and baking powder and add to egg yolks alternately with milk. Stir in melted and cooled shortening, and fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Bake in waffle iron.

—Jennifer Johnson, Stance

Older posts