Stance: Studies on the Family

Brigham Young University Student Journal

Tag: food

Easy Plant-Based Meals That Won’t Break the Bank

quinoa-1822176

Meal planning, right? We’ve all been there. Finding healthy, easy, and relatively inexpensive meal ideas isn’t for the faint of heart. As a vegan and gluten and soy free college student, I’ve come to find this out first hand!

Here are a couple of general principles I follow to keep my meals as cheap as possible:

 

  • Shop out of bulk bins as much as possible. Often items cost much, much less this way. Buying out of bulk bins is especially convenient when buying some ingredients for a new recipe that you don’t have on hand already. You can get just the amount you need, and then next time (if the recipe turns out, that is) you can stock up if you choose.That keeps the trial and error process of finding go-to meals as cost effective as possible. Some of the best bulk bins I’ve found are at Winco and Sprouts.

 

  • Use dried spices instead of fresh ones. Whether a spice is dried or fresh when it goes into a recipe often doesn’t significantly, if at all, alter the taste of the recipe. Buying dried spices can be cheaper and much more convenient. I don’t know about you, but when I have bought fresh spices here and there, I use a tiny little bit and then the rest goes to waste. Also, the jars of dried spices often have equivalency information so you can be sure you’re putting the right amount into your recipe.

Luckily, I have found a few good recipes that vegans and non-vegans alike have enjoyed, so hopefully some of these will ease the struggle for you just a bit. Besides being delicious, each of these recipes and meal ideas is also healthy AND easy AND relatively inexpensive. Three for three. The following are five recipes that I hope will be beneficial to you and your family:

 

Lentil Brown Rice Salad

This is a family favorite that makes a nice, light spring or summer meal when paired with a fresh green salad, cooked veggies, grilled or baked chicken if you aren’t vegetarian, or even grilled tofu if you are vegetarian. I’ve even eaten this as a stand-alone lunch before.

1 ½  cups cooked brown rice (cooked in veggie broth)

1 cup cooked lentils*, cooled

1 cup diced fresh tomatoes

⅓ cup sliced green onions, including tops

1 Tbsp snipped fresh parsley

2 Tbsp red wine vinegar

1 Tbsp olive oil

1 ½ tsp fresh lime juice

1 clove garlic, minced

1 tsp Dijon mustard

¼ tsp ground black pepper

Combine rice, lentils, tomatoes, onions, and parsley in medium bowl. Whisk remaining ingredients in small bowl; add to rice mixture and toss. Chill. Makes 4 servings.

*To cook lentils, combine ½ cup dry lentils with 1 cup water in saucepan. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, cover, and simmer 15 to 20 minutes or until lentils are tender. Drain.

 

Quinoa and Black Bean Salad

Another family favorite! Quinoa is packed with nutrition and is a complete protein by itself, so this salad can be a well-rounded meal by itself since it contains unrefined carbs, protein, vegetables, and a little healthy fat. Again, this can be paired with salad, other veggies, lean meat or tofu, or eaten by itself.

1 cup raw quinoa

1 ¾ cups water or veggie broth

2 Tbsp olive oil, divided

1 tsp grated lime zest

1 Tbsp fresh lime juice

1 (15 oz.) can black beans, drained and rinsed

¼-½ cup diced red bell pepper

¼-½ cup diced cucumber

1 roma tomato, chopped

¼ cup fresh cilantro

2 green onions

⅓ tsp salt

½ tsp black pepper

In a saucepan, combine quinoa, water or broth, and 1 Tbsp of oil. Bring to a boil and simmer on low heat for 20 minutes. Fluff quinoa with a fork and let cool to room temperature.

In a small bowl, whisk together lime zest, lime juice, and 1 Tbsp oil.

Transfer the quinoa to a bowl. Add beans, bell pepper, cucumber, tomato, and chopped cilantro. Drizzle with the lime mixture and toss gently to coat.

Serve warm or chilled. Makes 4 servings and 6 cups total.

 

Baked Potatoes

A baked potato bar is a great way for families to eat together while letting family members personalize their own meals. Some of my favorite toppings as a vegan are salsa, green onions, and guacamole. For non-vegans, sour cream, cheese, and butter are some additional options. Chili or leftover chunky soup or stew are other tasty toppings. A simple green salad really compliments these well, and feel free to add meat or tofu to round out the meal, if desired.

I usually follow this aluminum foil oven baking method from “The Kitchn” website.

 

Tomato Basil Cream Pasta

Some people live on Ramen noodles their freshman year of college (and for the duration in a lot of cases– let’s be real); however, I lived on this stuff. It’s quick and easy, and you can substitute ½ to ¾ a can of plain diced tomatoes for the fresh tomato called for in the recipe for convenience. Bulk bins are a great place to look for affordable prices on cashews.You could use whole wheat or brown rice pasta to make this very healthy, or you could even swap out pasta for quinoa. Add a cooked or raw veggie on the side and you’ve got a complete, hearty, nutritionally balanced meal!

Here is the recipe.

 

Easy Vegetable Curry

This goes together so quickly and so easily! It has a very mild flavor, as far as curries go, so don’t be scared if you’re weary of strong flavors. This goes great over rice, quinoa, or even pasta. Because it’s a vegetable curry, no additional vegetables are required to make this a complete meal–bonus! As always, a side of lean meat would be a healthy addition for non-vegetarians.

Here is the recipe.

 

Happy cooking!

By Samantha Bullock

 

Family, Food and Fun: Thanksgiving Recipes

Thanksgiving is coming up and FOOD is the word. When thinking about Thanksgiving, many of us number turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, and pie among the many things that we are grateful for. Many of the memories that I personally have surrounding this time of year involve cooking and eating together with my family (especially my grandma’s amazing coconut cream pie).

Screen Shot 2016-11-10 at 9.13.30 AM

Isn’t it interesting how the food we eat is such a central part of our culture and identity? Traditions surrounding food can vary widely from family to family, and even wider from culture to culture. Something that does not change between cultures, however, is the fact that food brings people together. Research shows that eating together as a family can make a huge difference in having a healthy family life.

Consider using this holiday season as an excuse to take some time to eat a good meal with your family. Cook together, or even just go out to a restaurant together if cooking isn’t your style. No matter where the food comes from, eating a meal and spending time together will create memories, and bring your family emotionally closer.  Now get together and eat up!  

P.S. I thought I’d share with you two of my favorite recipes that my mom would always make during the holidays! They’re easy, inexpensive, and delicious! Bon appétit!

Frozen Cranberry Whip

1) Mix in a large bowl: 1 package whole cranberries (ground in a food processor or blender), 2 cups of sugar, and 1 small package mini marshmallows (10 oz package)

2) Cover bowl and let it sit all day or overnight Screen Shot 2016-11-10 at 9.13.24 AM

3) Later: Whip 1 pint of whipping cream until stiff. Add 3 oz cream cheese (chopped into little chunks), and 1 large can crushed pineapple (drained)

4) Mix everything together (including sugar and cranberry mixture)

5) Separate into two bread-loaf pans, cover and freeze

6) To serve: Briefly run warm around the outside of the pan to loosen frozen loaf and slice up servings

Candied Sweet Potatoes

1) Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 9×13 baking dish

2) Boil a large pot of water, add sweet potatoes, boil until slightly underdone, about 15 minutes.

3) In a large saucepan combine 1 1/4 cups margarine, 1 1/4 cups brown sugar, 2 cups marshmallows, cinamon and nutmeg to taste.

4) Stir potatoes into the margarine sauce. While stirring mash the potatoes.

5) Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes, remove and top sweet potatoes wtih 1 cup of mashmallows, cook until marshmallows are slightly golden.

Written By Rian Gordon

Poppy Seed Dressing

by Cody Phillips

Whether it’s beginning to look a lot like springtime where you live or you’re still stuck in a polar vortex, a fresh spinach salad sprinkled with homemade poppy seed dressing will always brighten your day.

Continue reading

World’s Easiest Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies

by Rebecca Hamson

Sometimes you just need a delicious dessert, and you need it fast. These incredible pumpkin chocolate chip cookies can be made in just 15 minutes (including baking time) and with only three ingredients!

Continue reading

Zucchini Casserole

by Sarah Perkins

This has long been a favorite of mine, and if you happen to have a lot of zucchini that you just don’t know what to do with, it’s a great way to use it up!

Continue reading

The Provo Farmers Market

Farmers Market Logo

by Jenna Hoffman

The Provo Farmers Market is a whimsical weekend escape from the daily grind of school and work. Over the summer, my roommate let me tag along with her and now I can’t get enough of those little tents lining the sidewalk around Pioneer Park. I’ve decided to pay it forward, so now I try to bring a friend with me every week, and without fail, they fall in love with the place. Something about the fresh fruit and vegetables, folksy music, and friendly vendors will make you feel like you’ve stepped out of Provo and into Portland.

The easy-going atmosphere and feeling of camaraderie is nothing short of cathartic. And even if you don’t think the farmers market is “your scene,” it’s definitely worth it to go check it out once. Sit in the grass and listen t

 

o the musicians, suck on a flavored honey-stick, andget to know the people who put their heart and soul into their crafts and want to share the love with the rest of the community. But hurry! The market has about run its course this year. After October, we’ll have to wait until next summer to bask in the charm of the Provo Farmers Market again.

To learn more about the Provo Farmers Market, check out their website.

Top 5 Places to Eat in Provo/Orem . . . After Hours

by Alissa Holm

Every college student has experienced that moment: You’re starving. It’s midnight. Everything seems to be closed. So what do you do? Eat another bowl of cereal? Run to McDonalds and get a McDouble? Beg your roommates to make you food? Well, you don’t have to do any of these.

There are so many more options in the student-filled Provo/Orem area that can cater to your late-night cravings. Here’s a list of the top 5 places to eat in Provo/Orem . . . after hours.

Photo Credit: kadluba via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: kadluba via Compfight cc

1.)  Guru’s Café Guru’s is a local and fun restaurant. They’re open until 10pm on weekends and are sure to provide a fun atmosphere for you while you eat.

My recommendation: The cilantro lime quesadilla with a side of sweet potato fries. You will not regret it.

2.)  The Awful Waffle Just because the restaurant’s name has the word “awful” in it doesn’t mean it actually is awful. The Awful Waffle makes gourmet Belgian waffles, crepes, pizzas, and paninis—all until midnight on the weekends and 11pm on weeknights.

My recommendation: The Brussles waffle with raspberries and Nutella sauce.

3.)  Sammy’s Café Sammy’s is a Provo favorite, notorious for its picture-filled walls, delicious pie shakes, and moustache obsession. And, they’re open until midnight every night.

My recommendation: The cheesecake pumpkin pie shake. The best combination of cheesecake and pumpkin that you’ll ever taste.

4.)  In-N-Out Burger I grew up in Idaho, so I hadn’t had an In-N-Out burger until my freshman year at BYU, and it immediately earned its place as my favorite burger. In-N-Out is open until 1am on weekdays and 1:30am on the weekends. While you’re at it, be sure to check out their secret menu, found here: http://www.in-n-out.com/menu/not-so-secret-menu.aspx.

My recommendation: A regular cheeseburger with a chocolate shake. Can’t go wrong.

5.)  Roll Up Crepes This restaurant produces both savory and sweet crepes—made to either fill you up for a meal or indulge your sweet tooth. The names of their crepes are sure to keep you entertained as well—they have everything from “Awkward First Date,” made with bananas and ice cream, to “Just Friends,” made with caramel apples, cinnamon, and granola, to “Honeymoon,” made with mixed berries, dark chocolate, and almonds.  Oh, and they have sandwiches and paninis as well. They are open until 1am every night.

My recommendation: The Bachelorette—which has raspberries and white chocolate.

Want more reviews on Utah County activities? Like our Facebook page.

Five Ways To Eat Healthier in College

by Amanda Ricks

Eating healthy while in college can be a daunting task. Fast food restaurants, particularly ones with a dollar menu, are cheap and easily accessible, and this convenience can sometimes outweigh the negative consequences of eating foods that have been fried, saturated, or greased.

The following are some tips for cleaning up your diet:

  1. Stock your refrigerator with fresh fruits and vegetables. When it comes to a late night craving, you won’t feel guilty if you’ve snacked on carrots or grapes rather than a doughnut or chocolate cake.
  2. Plan time for your meals. If you plan time, you are more likely to eat a balanced and nutritious meal.
  3. Don’t always fall for the “free candy” gimmicks thrown at you by different clubs. Generally, the piece of taffy isn’t worth the time or signing a piece of paper. If the treat is your sole incentive for going to meetings, perhaps you could better spend your time making yourself a healthier meal that can fill you with nutrients.
  4. Make a shopping list. If you buy food and have meals planned, it will mostly end with pleasing results for your body and your pocketbook.
  5. Take healthy snacks to campus with you. If you have some almonds or dried fruit with you, you are less likely to buy a high-fat, high-sugar candy bar because you’re hungry in between classes. Additionally, carry water around with you on campus. Staying hydrated is key to being healthy.

Eating healthy in college can be affordable if the necessary time is put in. Who knows? Maybe next time you are thinking about making cookies for that cute boy in your ward, you can take him a plate of carrots instead.

The Stadium Farmers Market—Something for Everyone!

by Alissa Holm

The start of school brings not only students back to the BYU campus, but also many vendors to the annual Farmers Market at LaVell Edwards Stadium.

Every Thursday until October 25, about 25 vendors will fill the south parking lot of the stadium to sell their best fresh fruits and vegetables, crafts, and other local creations. This week, I attended the market and got a taste of the great products our local vendors have to offer.

Walking up and down the row of vendors, I couldn’t help but be impressed by the variety of local goods produced by our fellow Provo citizens. I saw everything from freshly popped kettle corn, to a tabletop football game, to homemade pies, to fresh fruit grown literally just down the road.

A Talk with a Vendor

I took some time during my first visit to speak with Sara Potter, baker and owner of “My Cutie Pies,” a small business that sells personal-sized pies. Sara has mastered the art of pie baking over the last seven years and turned her talent into a small business just over a year ago. She bakes personal-sized pies in flavors such as blueberry banana cream, apple, pumpkin, and raspberry and sells them for $3.50 each week at various farmers markets. Prior to each selling day, she spends a grueling twelve hours baking her pies. Sara says that baking the pies allows her to do what she loves and also to make a little extra money on the side.

Is It for Me?

Curious to see what it takes to become a vendor like Sara, I asked her what it was like to start her own small business. She says her expenses can get pretty high—for pie making, berries are her most expensive ingredients. There are also several startup taxes and fees associated with starting such businesses. But Sara did mention that this type of business might be good for other young married wives and mothers out there—Sara is a former student, but her husband is still in school. If your product is marketable and profitable, you could find yourself bringing in a good amount of money just from selling weekly at the Stadium Farmers Market.

I would highly recommend the Stadium Farmers Market to anyone. The experience is one you won’t regret, and you’ll be surprised with all that it has to offer. Who knows—you might just end up wanting to create your own station!

For More Information:

  • Additional information about becoming a vendor at the Farmers Market can be found here.
  • The vendor application form can be accessed here.
  • Several delicious recipes from the BYU Dining Services demo booth at the Market are listed here. Happy cooking, families!

Photo courtesy of Sara Potter, www.facebook.com/MyCutiePies