Stance: Studies on the Family

Brigham Young University Student Journal

Tag: Thanksgiving

Family, Food and Fun: Thanksgiving Recipes

Thanksgiving is coming up and FOOD is the word. When thinking about Thanksgiving, many of us number turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, and pie among the many things that we are grateful for. Many of the memories that I personally have surrounding this time of year involve cooking and eating together with my family (especially my grandma’s amazing coconut cream pie).

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Isn’t it interesting how the food we eat is such a central part of our culture and identity? Traditions surrounding food can vary widely from family to family, and even wider from culture to culture. Something that does not change between cultures, however, is the fact that food brings people together. Research shows that eating together as a family can make a huge difference in having a healthy family life.

Consider using this holiday season as an excuse to take some time to eat a good meal with your family. Cook together, or even just go out to a restaurant together if cooking isn’t your style. No matter where the food comes from, eating a meal and spending time together will create memories, and bring your family emotionally closer.  Now get together and eat up!  

P.S. I thought I’d share with you two of my favorite recipes that my mom would always make during the holidays! They’re easy, inexpensive, and delicious! Bon appétit!

Frozen Cranberry Whip

1) Mix in a large bowl: 1 package whole cranberries (ground in a food processor or blender), 2 cups of sugar, and 1 small package mini marshmallows (10 oz package)

2) Cover bowl and let it sit all day or overnight Screen Shot 2016-11-10 at 9.13.24 AM

3) Later: Whip 1 pint of whipping cream until stiff. Add 3 oz cream cheese (chopped into little chunks), and 1 large can crushed pineapple (drained)

4) Mix everything together (including sugar and cranberry mixture)

5) Separate into two bread-loaf pans, cover and freeze

6) To serve: Briefly run warm around the outside of the pan to loosen frozen loaf and slice up servings

Candied Sweet Potatoes

1) Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 9×13 baking dish

2) Boil a large pot of water, add sweet potatoes, boil until slightly underdone, about 15 minutes.

3) In a large saucepan combine 1 1/4 cups margarine, 1 1/4 cups brown sugar, 2 cups marshmallows, cinamon and nutmeg to taste.

4) Stir potatoes into the margarine sauce. While stirring mash the potatoes.

5) Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes, remove and top sweet potatoes wtih 1 cup of mashmallows, cook until marshmallows are slightly golden.

Written By Rian Gordon

November Challenge: THANKS giving

Every year we arrive at Thanksgiving amid a hustle and bustle of cooking and preparing.  More often than not we sit down for dinner and pause a moment or two to go around the table, allowing each person to name something they are thankful for.
Why not step up your game?? Spend the whole month thinking of things you are thankful for.
A few years ago I printed out a picture of a turkey on the biggest paper I could find.  At the top of the paper I wrote: “THINGS WE ARE THANKFUL FOR!”   Then I hung the paper on the wall along with a pen and told my family to write anything they thought of during the month.   At first only one or two words were added.   Gradually, over the course of the month, the kids started writing anything and everything!   By the end of the month, our poster was crowded with ideas from pizza to penguins.   Needless to say, our feelings of gratitude ran deeper that year, since we took the time to contemplate and focus on daily gratitude.
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If you’d like to try this with your family, here’s a turkey to copy and print. Or if you want your children to be more enthused, have one of them draw the turkey. There are also other great variations on this idea. What’s important is to take time to focus on our blessings, to focus on our gratitude.
Are you ready to take on this November Challenge?
“Gratitude is a catalyst to all Christlike attributes. A thankful heart is the parent of all virtues.” -Dieter F. Uchtdorf
 Happy Thanks Giving!!
Written by Phyllis Rosen

BYU/UVU Food Drive

web-art-1By Rebecca Hamson

The holiday season revolves around food in our society, yet there are so many people who have hardly any, let alone the excess that the rest of us are blessed with. Brigham Young University has teamed up with Utah Valley University, Community Action Services, and Food Bank to collect food and monetary donations for those living in impoverished circumstances in the Utah Valley.

The goal is to raise 60,000 dollars and 300,000 pounds of food. To reach this goal, there are events going on for the rest of November. There are also bins for non-perishable food drop-offs located throughout BYU campus and throughout Provo. The bins will be out until November 30. Money can be donated at businesses throughout BYU campus and at local businesses. The cashiers will most likely ask if you want to add an extra dollar to your total cost to donate to this cause. Every dollar donated can be made into five meals or fifteen pounds of food thanks to Community Action Services and Food Bank and their resources and influence. So, donate to a good cause this holiday season to benefit those that are right here in our own community.

Pumpkin Pie Cake

Spice up your Thanksgiving with a new pumpkin twist. Your family will love this delicious pumpkin recipe, and the best part is—it’s easier than pie.

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Eat Like a Pilgrim

downloadBy Sydnee Bowler

Around this time of year, it can be tempting to skip straight from Halloween’s trick-or-treating to Christmas’s caroling and tree decorating, but “Eat Like a Pilgrim” at Thanksgiving Point helps us to remember to celebrate that often-forgotten holiday in between, Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving Point offers the opportunity to travel back in time to the first Thanksgiving with their annual “Eat Like a Pilgrim” feast. Ranked by the New York Times as one of the best Thanksgiving re-enactments in the country, it’s sure to be a blast for the whole family. The event includes not only a 17th century re-enactment of the first Thanksgiving but an authentic old-style feast.

These exciting Thanksgiving festivities will fall on November 22, 23, and 25 this year, and will start at 6:00 pm. Tickets are $28 per adult and $18 per child and can be purchased at the Thanksgiving Point Box Office, over the phone by calling (801) 768-4900, or at the door day-of  (with a $5 fee). Be sure not to miss this family activity!

For more information, visit Thanksgiving Point’s website.

 

Butternut Squash Soup

by Lindsay Sandberg

With winter setting in, nothing sounds better than a rich soup. This butternut squash soup recipe is delicious. Using an immersion blender makes the process even simpler. Enjoy!

 

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Savoring the Holiday Season

1370760By Aimee Hancock

As my fingers scrape the bottom of the candy bucket (yes, it’s only a few days after Halloween, but I’m a college student who has to eat something to stay awake while studying), I feel a little sad that Halloween is over, and not just because the candy is almost gone. The pumpkins are caving into themselves; leaves are turning brown and falling, making the trees naked; the candy shelves are red and green instead of black and orange; and I can’t find Waldo anywhere on campus. However, I feel ok about it all because when I flip the calendar to the new month, Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and now I can start looking forward to that holiday.

That’s the way it should be—taking this season one holiday at a time. Lately it seems like all the fall and winter holidays are squished into a giant, blurry blob of candy, pine needles, and stuffing all topped with gravy. Christmas decorations come out so early that it seems like they never even leave the store. Sometimes I feel like I can’t even enjoy the holidays because before one has even happened, the next holiday is already screaming in my face, begging for attention.

I try my best to stop the holidays from melting together in my life; I like to make sure I’m not burnt out before the holidays even start. One holiday rule I have is no listening to Christmas music before Thanksgiving. There are really only so many Christmas songs, and if I start listening to them too early, I find that I get sick of them when Christmas actually rolls around. I like to save that music for Christmas so I can enjoy the songs during the setting they were meant for.

So this year, I’m looking forward to a lovely Thanksgiving dinner and, after all is said and eaten, I’ll crank up my radio and rock around the Christmas tree, enjoying the untainted and timely spirit of Christmas.

 

Sharing the Tradition: Recipes for Homemade Thanksgiving Pies

by Alissa Holm

Every year, my mom bakes between 5 and 10 pies of all flavors the day before Thanksgiving. In our family, pies are more than just a dessert—they’re a tradition. Nobody knows how to make pie better than my mother, so I’ve snuck into her secret recipe vault to uncover the best recipes for the two most classic, American, Thanksgiving pies—apple and pumpkin—and added to them her famous crust recipe.  Bon Appétit!

PERFECT APPLE PIE

6 to 8 tart apples, peeled, cored, thinly sliced (6 cups) (Granny Smith & Golden Delicious are best – salted)
3/4 to 1 cup sugar
2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Dash of nutmeg
Pastry for one double crust pie
2 Tbsp. butter
(If apples are sweet, sprinkle with 1 Tbsp. lemon juice.)

Mix dry ingredients into apples. Line 9-inch pie plate with pastry. Fill with apples, dot with butter. Moisten the crust around its top edges so the top crust will adhere.

Cut designs into top crust and lay it over apples; press top and bottom crusts together & crimp edges. Sprinkle with sugar, bake at 375–400 degrees for 40 to 50 mins., until done.

 

TAWNY PUMPKIN PIE

1 1/4 cup cooked or canned pumpkin or winter squash
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 tsp. ground ginger
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. flour
2 eggs, slightly beaten
1 cup evaporated milk
2 Tbsp. water
1/2 tsp. vanilla
1 unbaked (9”) pie shell

Combine first 6 ingredients; mix well; add eggs. Mix; add evaporated milk, water, and vanilla; mix well. Pour into pie shell. Bake in 400–425 degree oven for 45 to 50 minutes, until knife or toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. To keep crust edges from burning, gently cover with strips of aluminum foil.

 

BEST PIE CRUST

(makes 4 single crust pies; 2 double crust pies )
4 c. flour
1/2 cup ice water
1 Tbsp. sugar
1 Tbsp. white vinegar
2 tsp. salt
1 egg
1 3/4 cups shortening (chilled)

Hint: A secret for good pastry is to have all ingredients as COLD as possible. Crumb dry ingredients & shortening until the size of peas. Whip the egg, then stir in water and vinegar; stir into flour mixture a little at a time until it sticks together. (Handle as little as possible.) Divide into 4 equal parts; roll out between wax paper or layers of plastic cereal bag (bag works best!).