10 Ideas for Decorating with Mirrors

Decorating with mirrors can add elegance or edgy-ness to any home, apartment, or rental. Mirrors create the illusion of space, airiness, openness—making this decor choice perfect for small spaces, like hallways or tinier bedrooms.

A current trend is decorating with multiple mirrors on the same wall. The mirrors can be the same size or various sizes. Use frames of the same color or design, or try very different patterns and textures for contrast. Another fun decor idea to try is to create patterns with the mirrors on the wall.

The more different the style of the mirrors, the more eclectic the feel of the space in which you are decorating will be.

In contrast, the more uniform the style of the mirrors, the more refined and elegant the feel of the space in which you are decorating will be.

—Katie, Stance: Studies on the Family

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Pinterest Win: Lemonies

It is January. The glitter from New Year’s has faded, Martin Luther King Jr. Day is quickly becoming a memory, and all we have to look forward to is THE GRIND. Trust me, I feel the January blues. My way to counteract them is with a treat so sweet and summery, you can’t help but feel better after eating them.

Enter: The Lemon Brownies.

The name is somewhat of a oxymoron, so I prefer the name “lemonies”. Call them what you will, this recipe is a winter-winner.

vQeFAkncRkqfNMnjhhdu_Lemony Lemon Brownies 1

NOTE: I originally got this recipe from another site that is now out of business. This site has the same recipe, but attributes it to this source. Picture from this source.

 

 

 

Lemonies

INGREDIENTS

    For the Brownie

  • 1cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 3cup flour
  • 2 eggs, large
  • 2 tablespoons lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3cup granulated sugar
  • 1teaspoon sea salt

    For the tart lemon glaze

  • 4 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 8 teaspoons lemon zest
  • 1cup icing sugar

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Grease an 8×8 inch baking dish with butter and set aside.
  3. Zest and juice two lemons and set aside.
  4. In the bowl of an electric mixture fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the flour, sugar, salt, and softened butter until combined.
  5. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, lemon zest, and lemon juice until combined.
  6. Pour it into the flour mixture and beat for 2 mins at medium speed until smooth and creamy.
  7. Pour into baking dish and bake for 23-25 mins, should turn golden around the edges.
  8. Allow to cool completely before glazing. Do not overbake, or the bars will dry.
  9. Filter the powdered sugar and whisk with lemon zest and juice.
  10. Spread the glaze over the brownies with a rubber spatula and let glaze set.
  11. Cut into bars and serve.

 

-Sam Lund, Social Media Director

Emma Smith: How Much Could One Heart Take?

Emma Smith is a source of contestation and conflicting viewpoints for many within the LDS community. A popular song (at least amongst missionaries I served with) about Emma Smith has the refrain “How much could one heart take?” as it’s main theme. The popularity of the song concerns me. Not because of hatred or ill-will towards Emma, but because the theme of the song seems to be justifying actions that move us away from the Church as long as our lives are hard. A sentiment that does not seem to be scripturally supported (God will not suffer you to be tempted above that which ye are able, anyone?) and is potentially damaging.

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This is not to say however that we should shift the pendulum to the other side and judge Emma or anyone else for their choices, because we do not understand what they are going through and what experiences led them to make the choices that they did. We should strive for a middle ground, where we seek to understand and empathize with others, without judging or justifying their behavior, two-sides of the same coin. Both of these place us in a position where we make a final determination about someone’s intentions or worthiness, which is well beyond our place as mere mortals, flawed and trying to find our way in this crazy world.

Section 25 of the Doctrine and Covenants is revelation specifically for Emma, however it closes with the following verse: “And verily, verily, I say unto you, that this is my voice unto all. Amen” (D&C 25:16). All can draw from the counsel given to Emma and apply the principles in our own lives.

“And verily I say unto thee that thou shalt lay aside the things of this world, and seek for the things of a better” (D&C 25:10). We can “lay aside the things of this world” by ceasing to justify or judge ourselves and others and “seek for the things of a better” by seeing the potential that we all have. We must look past the flawed choices that others make to find the intentions and motivations that drove them. We must seek understanding, so that we can love one another.

—Conor Hilton, Stance: Studies on the Family

Moroccan, Islamic Women and Latter-day Saints

When I first read the title “Moroccan Women’s Integration of Family and Religion,” I was at once piqued. I am always eager to learn new insights into other cultures and religions, and Donna Lee Bowen gives an insightful account of her findings from the women’s lives she submerged herself in.

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Islam is the dominant religion in Morocco, making the majority of its population Muslim. As I continued to read the article, I was presented with facts about Islam, and the people who follow it, that I had never heard before in a history class.

A controversial topic in Western Society is the inequality of Muslim women. But as Bowen points out, when laws and customs are taken out of their social context of course they seem unequal. One law gives twice the amount of a wife’s inheritance to her husband than vice versa. To members of Western society this screams of gender inequality, but the purpose of this law is to give male family members more of the inheritance so that they can take care of the women. Not unequal, but a check to make sure everyone in the family can support each other. Pondering over this example, and other examples that Bowen gives, I began to see parallels between Islam and Mormonism.

Moroccan, Islamic Woman (image from here)

How much anti-Mormon literature takes quotes and statements out of context, using them to slander our religion? How many people have been turned away from the Gospel of Christ because of a misconstrued myth about Mormon culture? It happens all the time to Latter-day Saints, and reviewing what I hear on the news and other media sources it happens to Muslims, as well.

Now I am not saying that every Muslim custom is misunderstood, but I believe that a religion that champions family and equal family roles deserves understanding. Ignorance is the main cause of misunderstanding, but knowledge can bring enlightenment. After reading this article, I believe that as a Latter-day Saint who seeks to enlighten those who misunderstand my beliefs and culture, I must first enlighten myself to my misunderstandings of others.

—BrookeAnn Henriksen, Stance: Studies on the Family

Grande Mosque Hassan II, a mosque in Casablanca, Morocco (image from here)